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70s Music Chart January 3rd 1970 part two

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Rolf Harriss 300x219 150x150 70s Music Chart January 3rd 1970 part twoThis is the second article on the BBC charts of the 3rd January 1970, as this was a chart that started in the 1970s it obviously had a great amount of music from the end of the 1960s, so that why on this one occasion we have two postings for the weekly chart.

We now countdown the charts from no.10 to no.1.

 

 

Jumbo time

This is the year that the impossible happened as we did see an Elephant fly, well a Jumbo, well a Jumbo jet really that came to the UK, and has been part of the world of aviation ever since. The original Boeing 747 was produced by the Boeing Company, and this was the year that the Jumbo jet actually flew commercially. The wide body plane had two levels allowing having the huge amount of passengers or huge payloads. The design and manufacturer started in the mid-1960s, and was developed from ideas by the American Airforce and the  then President of Pan AM Juan Trippe , who really believed this had to be the future of passenger airlines, and he even linked it to world peace too.

Pan Am ordered 25 planes, so he was putting his money where his mouth was. In Seattle the factory was set up and the planes grew. And in January 1970 the wife of President Nixon christened the first Pan Am plane as Young American, later changed to Clipper Victor in Washington, and the first flight from New York to London Heathrow was January 22nd 1970, but a substitute plane had to be used as the first one overheated. The first flight to the UK carried 332 passengers and 20 crew and around 30,000 pounds of cargo, and was watched by the world as it touched down in London, although 30 passengers did not show for the journey, as the flight had been delayed by six hours, and those people either cancelled or got another flight to the UK.

 

The captain on the flight was Robert Weeks who flew the 225 foot, five storeys high Jumbo across the Atlantic on the maiden voyage, and landed at 14.14 GMT. The Jumbo was now here and the Brits had placed an order for eleven and soon it would be a huge financial success as it would be very cost effective, as carrying so many passengers than over air planes meant a quicker return. Within six months the Jumbo would already reach its One Million passengers, and within one year it would be seven million and have seventeen airlines using the amazing Jumbo jet.

In August the Jumbo had a hijacking en route to Cuba from New York. When it landed at Cuba even Castro came out to look at this huge plane on his land, and even had a meeting with the airline pilot Captain Watkins. Castro was concerned that when the hijacking was over that the plane would not be able to take off on such a small runway. Luckily it did, and it flew back to the US with all problems sorted.

The most famous Jumbo incident was not until the late 1980s when a Jumbo jet was flying over Lockabie in Scotland, when a bomb went off on board and killed everyone on the flight. 259 on board and 11 on the ground. This was Pam Am flight 103, and years later Gaddafi and Libya were found to be responsible for the bombing.

No. 10

Without You by Tom Jones

Sex bomb Tom Jones born in 1940 was so huge in the 1960s and would be a huge star in the 1970s, especially with his TV shows.

Article about Tom Jones

This week Tom appeared on the BBC singing “Delilah” in “Pop Goes The Sixties”.


N0. 9

Tracey by Cufflinks

New York born Ron Dante was the front man of this group of backing singers, although his name was not mentioned for reasons we will explain later. The record is often referred to as great bubblegum music.

Dante would work as a producer a few years later for Barry Manilow and “Mandy“.

N0. 8

Winter World Of Love by Engelbert Humperdinck

Lyrics to “Winter World Of Love”.

Named after a German composer, but originally born as Arnold George Dacey in 1936, and known as Tom Jones major competition, here he is with a beautiful song of the music of the 70s.

No. 7

All I have To Do Is Dream by Bobbie Gentry and Glenn Campbell

Article about Glenn Campbell

Bobbie born 1944 in 1975 married Jim Stafford who had a hit with “Spiders and Snakes”.

Glenn was to become the “Rhinestone Cowboy”.

This song was originally a hit for The Everly Brothers in 1958.

No. 6

Yester-Me, Yester-You,Yesterday by Stevie Wonder

Stevie was born blind in 1950 as Stevland Hardaway Judkins and has won twenty two Grammy awards, not that many really.

Lyrics for Yester-Me,Yester-You,Yesterday.

The song comes from the album “My Cherie La Mour”

Article about Stevie Wonder

No. 5

Melting Pot by Blue Mink

No. 4

Suspicious Minds by Elvis Presley

Written by Mark James and featuring heavy in Elvis comeback special in 1968, and of course Elvis died in 1977.

A hit again in January 1977

No. 3

Sugar sugar by Archies

We welcome back  Ron Dante who was also the voice behind this record based on a cartoon series, yet another bubble gum record.

Because he had another record in the charts by another record company his name had to be kept in the background.

Dont worry fellow singer on this record is Andy Kim who would have a number One later in the decade with “Rock Me Gently”.

No. 2

Ruby Don’t Take Your Love To Town by Kenny Rogers and the First Edition

Kenny Rogers article

Before he had the Chicken outlets, Kenny added his voice to this great record, and it was all done in one take.

Originally a hit for Johnny  Darrell in 1967.

No. 1

Two Little Boys by Rolf  Harris

Australian entertainer, artist and BBC show host Rolf forced his Saturday night TV show producer to allow him to sing this on his live TV show. He did and the public loved it and it became the very first Number One in the 1970s.

The record dates back to 1902 and tells the story of two boys during the American Civil war.

The chart for No. 40 to No. 21 for January 3rd 1970 here

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One Response to “70s Music Chart January 3rd 1970 part two”

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